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Gunther Schuller in The Independent


(Gunther Schuller at the Mingus Festival 2013, photo by Sue Mingus)


Read the article here

“Gunther Schuller’s passing is a major loss to the world of both classical and jazz music. Not many have covered the musical spectrum as he did. One of Schuller’s earliest collaborations with Charles Mingus was conducting a Mingus composition called “Revelations” in 1955 at the Brandeis Festival of the Creative Arts. His last association with Mingus music was editing and conducting Mingus’s magnum opus “Epitaph”— a work that was 4000 measures long, required thirty-one musicians and almost three hours to perform. It was premiered in 1989 at Philharmonic Hall in New York, and was subsequently performed at Wolf Trap, Tanglewood, Chicago Symphony Center, Cleveland Symphony Hall, San Francisco Symphony Hall, and other venues.” — Sue Mingus

Gunther Schuller

Gunther Schuller, Who Bridged Classical Music And Jazz, Dies At 89

Gunther helped dignify jazz as America’s classical music and he conducted Charles’s 3-hour masterwork Epitaph. His support was invaluable. It’s a major loss to our music.


(Photo: Gunther conducts Epitaph in 2007)


Listen to a conversation with Gunther Schuller about Charles Mingus’s monumental “Epitaph,” 25 years after its world premiere. Recorded in front of a live audience at the Cornelia Street Cafe on January 15, 2014. Click here for the link.

Mingus Sings releases June 23rd

We are pleased to announce the first ever Mingus vocal album:

Mingus Sings

with Ku-umba Frank Lacy and the Mingus Big Band



With lyrics by Charles Mingus, Joni Mitchell, Elvis Costello, and Sue Mingus.  It also features Noonlight– a never-before-recorded Mingus composition discovered in the Mingus archives.

Pre-order the album here


Lew Soloff

Lew Soloff‘s passing is a profound loss to me personally and to everyone in the Mingus Big Band.
We will miss Lew as the great friend and musician he was and as the celebrant of life who was as excited about food and feasts and new discoveries of all kinds as he was about music and trumpet playing. We shared meals around the world — Lew was forever investigating and uncovering some new place even here in the city. His vitality and his enthusiasm for life inspired all of us. He will be profoundly missed.
— Sue Mingus