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Talented young pianist Esteban Castro sits in with Mingus Big Band

Esteban Castro

Sue Mingus with Esteban Castro, 12 years old, who played with both the 46th St Ensemble and the Jazz House Kids Big Band at the 7th Annual Charles Mingus High School Competition and Festival, and sat in with the Mingus Big Band on Sunday night! (He was incredible!)

Read more about this year’s festival.

Blue Notes: Mingus Big Band, The Cold Spring Quartet, more

One of the great jazz traditions in New York is the Monday-night performances by the Mingus Big Band at the Jazz Standard. When I heard them there on Jan. 12, the top soloists were saxophonist Wayne Escoffery, trombonist Frank Lacy, and trumpeter Alex Norris. Norris, of course, grew up in Howard County and teaches jazz part time at the Peabody Institute. And at the Jazz Standard’s bar, he told me he’d be holding the special “pre-release” show for his new album, “Extension Deadline,” at Peabody on Jan. 27.

Read the full article here.

South Coast Jazz Festival: The Mingus Underground Octet

Yesterday the Mingus Underground Octet closed the South Coast Jazz Festival in the U.K.  Notes from the review:

“The Mingus Underground Octet mined the labyrinthine oeuvre of a truculent talent…

Highlights on the night were Fables Of Faubus, a caustic blast at the endemic racism of the United States, and Better Git It In Your Soul which featured a howling solo from tenor saxophonist Terry Pack.”

Read the full review here.

Houston Press: Jazz’s Five Great Protest Songs

Excerpt from The Houston Press:

Charles Mingus, “Original Fables of Faubus”
In 1957, then-Gov. Orval Faubus ignored a unanimous decision by the U.S. Supreme Court by ordering the Arkansas National Guard to prevent the Little Rock Nine from legally entering a newly desegregated school. The absurdity of the event, placing military guards armed to the teeth in order to keep unarmed teenagers from lawfully entering school, drew the ire from many public officials, but the most razing attack came from one of jazz’s most innovative bassists, Charles Mingus.

Featured on Candid Records, the “Original Fables of Faubus” remains one of jazz’s most sardonically crafted songs today. It cheekily pokes fun at Faubus’ finer fascist features with a call-and-response approach: “Name me someone ridiculous, Dannie?/ Governor Faubus!/ Why’s he so sick and ridiculous?/ Because he won’t permit integrated schools!/ Well, he’s a fool!”

As Mingus howls his last response without mincing his words, he reminds us that Faubus wasn’t the only public official responsible. Eisenhower and Rockefeller shared the maligned governor’s shame by turning a blind eye to the events, attempting to minimize the stakes on a national scope. Echoes of “Boo! Ku Klux Klan (with your Jim Crow plan)” resonate today given the current state of racial politics. From a historical point of view, it wasn’t that long ago; moreover, it also reminds us that there is still much to be discussed.

Read the full article here