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Reviews: Mingus Big Band at Ronnie Scott’s, Oct 20-25, 2014

Thank you to Ronnie Scott’s for hosting a great week of Mingus music in London!

The Telegraph (click for link)

“Profound… The moments when the band came together were the most fascinating, because you could see anarchy and tight discipline rubbing shoulders… Holding these things in balance is bound to stir up unruly emotions, not at all of them bright. Sometimes it seemed as if the sheer intensity on that stage could spill over into a fist-fight. That feeling carries us back to something primordial in jazz, which is why these annual visits by the Mingus Big Band have become a fixture in the jazz-lover’s calendar.”

London Jazz News (click for link)

A great tradition has been invented: this time of year has become synonymous with the Mingus Big Band spending a week at Ronnie Scott’s.  Impressive display of interplay and remarkable improvisational talent present all evening.”

Jazzwise Magazine (click for link)

“The 14-piece ensemble that plays the music of Charles Mingus is a big beast of an orchestra that roars mightily but knows how to seductively purr when revealing the wry sensitivity that was also an integral part of the great bassist-pianist-composer’s psyche. “

Tomorrow: The Music of Charles Mingus, a Master Class

Tomorrow!

Tuesday, Oct 28th, 2014
Manhattan School of Music
3-5pm
Carla Bossi Comelli Studio (7th Floor)

120 Claremont Ave. (122nd St. near Broadway)

Lecture by Ken Pullig of Berklee College of Music
Presented by Sue Mingus & Let My Children Hear Music, Inc.

Free & Open to the Public!

Ken Pullig is the retired Chair of Jazz Composition at Berklee College of Music where he taught Mingus for three decades. He is also the author of the upcoming book– Mingus Music!

 

Mingus Music featured at the Brooklyn Academy of Music Film Festival

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On June 27th, the Mingus Dynasty performed at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (click for link) for the screening of Manny Kirchheimer’s 1981 film “Stations of the Elevated”.

The film hasn’t been seen much since, except by generations of graffiti fans and writers who watched it on VHS tapes. Now it’s being re-released on the big screen, with a showing Friday at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. It will hit screens around the country this fall.

Stations of the Elevated is not a documentary in the usual sense. It’s only 45 minutes long; there’s no narrative and hardly any dialogue. The camera follows subway cars painted from top to bottom with vibrant graffiti compositions over a soundtrack of jazz by Charles Mingus.

Stations of the Elevated on NPR’s All Things Considered (click for link)

 

Mingus Music performed by JALC Ensemble in Chicago

On March 28th, 2014, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis performed works by Charles Mingus and Duke Ellington.

“By spotlighting music from both artists’ enormous oeuvres in a single program, the orchestra shed light on the similarities of jazz giants often perceived as contrasting figures.

…Mingus’ music surely builds on Ellington’s precedents (as does almost everything in jazz), vigorously developing its harmonic, rhythmic and tonal vocabularies. The centerpiece here was Ron Westray’s arrangement of four pieces from Mingus’ “Tijuana Moods” album, the orchestra riding the twists and turns of this tremendously ornate music with considerable technical elan. Marsalis’ whirring, high-register trumpet flurries on “Dizzy Moods,” Elliot Mason’s lusty trombone exhortations in “Los Mariachis” and Victor Goines’ muscular tenor saxophone solo in “Ysabel’s Table Dance” stood out.

But, ultimately, it was the riot of sound that the ensemble produced, while somehow making sure that the motifs of individual orchestral sections rang out, that represented the greatest feat of this performance. That the band also looked at Mingus’ introspective side, in a warmly whispered version of his “Self-Portrait in Three Colors,” deepened one’s appreciation for the composer’s range and the performers’ sensitivity to it.”

Read the full review in the Chicago Tribune here