Mingus Music in Upcoming Jazz Documentary

The Mingus Composition “Jelly Roll” will be featured in the upcoming documentary “Jazz Nights: A Confidential Journey”! 

JAZZ NIGHTS: A CONFIDENTIAL JOURNEY is a documentary that chronicles a fleeting and almost completely unknown moment in time involving a group of L.A.’s top jazz musicians who congregated in alternating configurations every Sunday night  for two years to explore not only jazz music, but friendship, community, and creative risk-taking. Once a week, these expert musicians formed a circle, a coterie of non-verbal, intuitive communication. There were no pre-determined set lists, no rehearsals. Attendance was through word-of-mouth only. No advertising. In many ways, these musical nights poignantly echoed the Prohibition Era speakeasies of the 1920s as well as the ’50s underground jazz clubs of Harlem and Greenwich Village in both mood and in the incredible exploratory and clandestine nature of the whole experience.  In addition to the music and setting, these cutting-edge musicians explore, via in-depth interviews, their lives, influences, backstories, upbringings, inspirations, and cultural affiliations. The result is an evocative tapestry of live music, thoughts and memories, and a snapshot of a moment in time amidst an ever-evolving American landscape.

Rutgers Mingus Band performs October 14th

Tonight the Rutgers University Mingus Band performs at the Nicholas Music Center in New Brunswick, NJ, featuring selections from Intrusions and Oh Yeah. Tenor saxophonist and alum Abraham Burton leads the ensemble.

Wednesday, October 14, 7:30 p.m.

Click here for more details

Mingus music in Robert Frank film

An up-coming authorized documentary entitled “Don’t Blink” about photographer Robert Frank (“The Americans”)  will include three Mingus compositions:   “Nostalgia in Times Square,”  “Haitian Fight Song,” and “Wham Bam Thank You Ma’am.”

From the early ’90s on, Frank has been making his films and videos with the brilliant editor Laura Israel, who has helped him to keep things homemade and preserve the illuminating spark of first contact between camera and people/places. Don’t Blink is Israel’s like-minded portrait of her friend and collaborator, a lively rummage sale of images and sounds and recollected passages and unfathomable losses and friendships that leaves us a fast and fleeting imprint of the life of the Swiss-born man who reinvented himself the American way, and is still standing on ground of his own making at the age of 90.

The film will premiere at the New York Film Festival in October.